Edaville Railroad put up for sale

RELATED TOPICS: STEAM/PRESERVATION
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CARVER, Mass. – The Edaville Railroad, one of the oldest tourist railroads in the United States, is for sale. Developer Jon Delli Priscoli told GateHouse News Service that Edaville USA amusement park operators Brenda Johnson and Robert Julian have decided not to renew their lease, which prompted him to put the attraction on the block with a $10 million asking price. “Ideally, we’d like to have someone come in and buy the entire operation and keep Edaville running, and I can give that about three months to happen,” said Delli Priscoli, “But if we can’t find a buyer, I’m going to have to sell the land parcels, the buildings, and the equipment separately.”
 
The late Ellis D. Atwood gave the park its name with his initials (E.D.A). He started the railroad in 1947, purchasing much of the surviving equipment from Maine’s two-foot gauge railroads. Atwood built a 5½-mile long railroad around his 1,800-acre cranberry plantation.
CARVER, Mass. – The Edaville Railroad, one of the oldest tourist railroads in the United States, is for sale. Developer Jon Delli Priscoli told GateHouse News Service that Edaville USA amusement park operators Brenda Johnson and Robert Julian have decided not to renew their lease, which prompted him to put the attraction on the block with a $10 million asking price. “Ideally, we’d like to have someone come in and buy the entire operation and keep Edaville running, and I can give that about three months to happen,” said Delli Priscoli, “But if we can’t find a buyer, I’m going to have to sell the land parcels, the buildings, and the equipment separately.”
 
The late Ellis D. Atwood gave the park its name with his initials (E.D.A). He started the railroad in 1947, purchasing much of the surviving equipment from Maine’s two-foot gauge railroads. Atwood built a 5½-mile long railroad around his 1,800-acre cranberry plantation.
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