Conrail merger family tree

A genealogy of the well-known railroads that make up today's system
Conrail (Consolidated Rail Corporation)
Conrail (Consolidated Rail Corporation)
After the failure of Penn Central in 1970, the government formed the United States Railway Association in 1973 to develop a plan to save railroading in the Northeast. The result: Consolidated Rail Corp., which on April 1, 1976, took over the properties of PC and six smaller roads. On August 22, 1998, Norfolk Southern and CSX purchased 58% and 42% percent of Conrail stock, respectively, dividing the railroad between them. Each owner began operating their portion on June 1, 1999. In three jointly-owned "shared asset" areas, Conrail still exists as a local freight provider.
Monongahela Railway
Monongahela Railway
Monongahela Railway was incorporated in 1900 jointly by Pennsylvania and Pittsburgh & Lake Erie. In 1925 Baltimore & Ohio was admitted and ownership split into thirds. P&LE sold its third to Conrail in 1989, and B&O successor CSX did the same a year later. Conrail absorbed Monongahela in 1992.
Lehigh Valley Railroad
Lehigh Valley Railroad
Delaware, Lehigh, Schuylkill & Susquehanna was incorporated in 1846 to build from the coal center of Mauch Chunk, Pa., to Easton, where the Lehigh River flows into the Delaware. Renamed Lehigh Valley Railroad in 1853 and opened in 1855. By the 1930's, Pennsylvania Railroad owned 31% of LV stock, increased to full ownership in 1961. LV filed for bankruptcy on June 21, 1970, and was among the properties conveyed to Conrail on April 1, 1976.
Reading Company
Reading Company
Philadelphia & Reading chartered in 1833, opened in 1842, became a property of the holding firm Reading Company in an 1896 reorganization. (Note: Proper pronunciation is redding.) Reading entered bankruptcy in November 1971 and was among the properties conveyed to Conrail on April 1, 1976.
Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines
Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines
The Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines was the jointly owned June 25, 1933, consolidation of Pennsylvania Railroad's West Jersey & Seashore, which dated from 1896, and Reading Company's Atlantic City Railroad, an 1883 narrow-gauge acquisition. PRSL was among the properties conveyed to Conrail on April 1, 1976.
Lehigh & Hudson River Railway
Lehigh & Hudson River Railway
Warwick Valley opened in 1862 as 6-foot-gauge line, standard-gauged in 1880. It was extended southwest as Lehigh & Hudson River, a name adopted for both lines in 1882. L&HR filed for bankruptcy on April 18, 1872, and was among the properties conveyed to Conrail on April 1, 1976.
Central Railroad of New Jersey
Central Railroad of New Jersey
Elizabethtown & Somerville opened from Elizabethport to Elizabeth, N.J., in 1836 as a horse-drawn railroad. Somerville & Easton incorporated in 1847 and bought the E&S in 1849 and adopted the name Central Railroad Company of New Jersey. Philadelphia & Reading controlled CNJ 1883-87. CNJ entered bankruptcy March 22, 1967, and was among the properties conveyed to Conrail on April 1, 1976.
Lehigh & New England Railroad
Lehigh & New England Railroad
Earliest ancestor, South Mountain & Boston, was chartered in 1873. Several reorganizations later, one in 1895 produced the Lehigh & New England. Never a solid performer, L&NE petitioned for abandonment in 1960; Jersey Central acquired about 40 miles' worth, but the rest was abandoned in 1961.
Erie Lackawanna Railroad
Erie Lackawanna Railroad
Erie-Lackawanna was formed October 17, 1960, by merger of Erie Railroad and Delaware, Lackawanna & Western. (The hyphen was dropped in 1963.) In 1968, EL was forced onto Norfolk & Western but kept separate; EL filed for bankruptcy June 22, 1972, after damage by Hurricane Agnes, and was among the properties conveyed to Conrail on April 1, 1976.
Erie Railroad
Erie Railroad
New York & Erie chartered in April 1832. The first train ran in 1841 on 6-foot gauge track. Reorganized as Erie Railway in 1859. Entire system was standard-gauged on June 22, 1880. Erie merged with Delaware, Lackawanna & Western October 17, 1960, to form Erie-Lackawanna.
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad
Cayuga & Susquehanna completed in 1834 between Owego and Ithaca, N.Y. Consolidation of successors Delaware & Cobb's Gap and Lackawanna & Western in 1853 formed the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western. Track gauge converted from 6-foot to standard on March 15, 1876. Exploration of combination with Erie Railroad began in 1954, and merger occurred October 17, 1960, as Erie-Lackawanna.
Penn Central Company
Penn Central Company
Penn Central was created February 1, 1968 by merger of Pennsylvania and New York Central. Entered bankruptcy on June 21, 1970. Because of PC's failure and its size, the federal government created Conrail, to which PC was conveyed on April 1, 1976.
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad
The oldest ancestor of what became the New York, New Haven & Hartford was the Old Colony Railroad, which opened in 1845. On August 6, 1872, the New York & New Haven and the Hartford & New Haven were consolidated as NYNH&H. The last of several reorganizations occurred July 7, 1961, and the bankrupt "New Haven" was forced onto newly created Penn Central on December 31, 1968.
New York Central System
New York Central System
The Mohawk & Hudson Rail Road was incorporated in 1826 and opened in 1831 between Albany and Schenectady, N.Y. In 1853, several railroads linking Albany and Buffalo consolidated as New York Central, which through the years assumed control of Boston & Albany; Michigan Central; Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis (the "Big Four"); Ohio Central; and Pittsburgh & Lake Erie. NYC in 1957 announced intent to merge with rival Pennsylvania, and merger as Penn Central was finally effected February 1, 1968.
Pennsylvania Railroad
Pennsylvania Railroad
Pennsylvania Railroad chartered April 13, 1846; by 1852, ran from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh. PRR extended its empire by leasing, acquiring, and consolidating other roads including Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago; Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis ("Panhandle"); and Vandalia. PRR announced in 1957 its intent to merge with rival New York Central, and merger as Penn Central effected Feb. 1, 1968.
Long Island Rail Road
Long Island Rail Road
Long Island Rail Road was chartered in 1834, and controlled by Pennsylvania Railroad from 1900 to 1966, when PRR sold LIRR to newly created Metropolitan Commuter Transportation Authority, now the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
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