Wisconsin Senator introduces competitive switching legislation

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WASHINGTON — U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., is calling on the federal government to require competitive switching between railroads to better serve shippers. Last week, Baldwin introduced the Rail Shipper Fairness Act that aims to reduce costs and improve service problems in Wisconsin and across the country.

“Our Wisconsin businesses need a quality and responsive railroad system to effectively get their goods to market,” Baldwin says. “This legislation will address the challenges faced by local businesses and help drive our Wisconsin economy forward.”

Besides having the STB implement competitive switching rules that would permit more than one railroad to service a customer, the legislation would prohibit railroads from charging customers for fuel in a way that does not correlate with actual fuel costs.

While the Association of American Railroads has previously come out against competitive switching, shippers groups applauded Baldwin’s effort including the American Chemistry Council.

NEWSWIRETrains News Wire

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