California county offers free land to get high-speed rail maintenance yard

RELATED TOPICS: HIGH SPEED RAIL
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FRESNO - The battle to land a San Joaquin Valley high-speed rail maintenance yard intensified when Kern County's bid was sweetened with an offer of free land, according to a story in the Fresno Bee. At least eight possible sites for a heavy maintenance yard between Fresno and Bakersfield have been advanced, including one south of Fresno and one in Hanford.

Monday, San Joaquin Valley agriculture giant Paramount Farms said it would donate 180 acres to the California High-Speed Rail Authority if it awards the yard to Shafter. Kern County high-speed rail boosters trumpeted the offer as a shot across Fresno's bow.

"Fresno is the enemy," Bill Thomas, a former congressman from Bakersfield, told The Bakersfield Californian newspaper.

Fresno County Supervisor Henry R. Perea responded Tuesday:
"Kern County is doing what it has to do in its attempt to be successful. But getting free land, while great for them, isn't a game-changer. From a lot of different perspectives, Fresno is in the superior position.

The high speed rail authority already has decided that a maintenance yard should be in the San Joaquin Valley. It would employ 1,500 people and have an annual payroll of about $110 million.
FRESNO - The battle to land a San Joaquin Valley high-speed rail maintenance yard intensified when Kern County's bid was sweetened with an offer of free land, according to a story in the Fresno Bee. At least eight possible sites for a heavy maintenance yard between Fresno and Bakersfield have been advanced, including one south of Fresno and one in Hanford.

Monday, San Joaquin Valley agriculture giant Paramount Farms said it would donate 180 acres to the California High-Speed Rail Authority if it awards the yard to Shafter. Kern County high-speed rail boosters trumpeted the offer as a shot across Fresno's bow.

"Fresno is the enemy," Bill Thomas, a former congressman from Bakersfield, told The Bakersfield Californian newspaper.

Fresno County Supervisor Henry R. Perea responded Tuesday:
"Kern County is doing what it has to do in its attempt to be successful. But getting free land, while great for them, isn't a game-changer. From a lot of different perspectives, Fresno is in the superior position.

The high speed rail authority already has decided that a maintenance yard should be in the San Joaquin Valley. It would employ 1,500 people and have an annual payroll of about $110 million.
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